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Jane Hutcheon

broadcaster/journalist/author

31 Dec
2018

Getting the Most Out of Your Year Personal Life

Jane Hutcheon

“Christmas tree!” My daughter yells as we step onto the escalator at David Jones.  It's October and it's a timely reminder that the end of the year is about to hit me with light speed. 

The Christmas tree sighting releases a small surge of panic, but I’m thankful to DJ’s for triggering my annual burst of planning for the next year.  It doesn’t matter when you initiate this.  Another great time is as soon as the 2019 diaries start to appear.  Go for the diaries which start in December because in my realm, a year is thirteen months.

It can be stressful to hit the road in January. I know.  I should have posted this in November.

With a bit of forethought you can ease into the weight of expectation, excitement, inspiration, order, chaos or introspection that can overwhelm us in January with the start of another new year.

Here are some thoughts to get you started...

  1. Holidays.  A good place to start is to block out your leave/holiday dates on a single page calendar or your new diary where the whole year is on a page or a double page.  Using different colours and annotating what you intend to do helps to lift the spirits as you anticipate the journeys or events you’ll make in the coming twelve months. It’s motivating as it’s always good to have something to look forward to.

 

  1. Do you keep a diary?  My friend keeps a diary which he writes only throughout the month of January. I see him having lunch on the benches of the high-rise building where we work.  He writes long-hand in an A4 notebook and the look on his face as he writes is one of calm and accomplishment.  Then January is over and the the exercise book is put away for another year.

 

  1. Academic Paul Dolan is a Professor of Behavioural Science in the UK and has advised the UK government on wellbeing.  In his ground-breaking 2014 book Happiness by Design, Paul describes how being happier means allocating attention more efficiently; towards things that bring us pleasure and purpose.

After interviewing Paul in 2015, I decided to do my own annual happiness stock-take, which I’ve done for the last three years.  I keep the lists in a locked file on my phone.  

Doing an annual stock-take gets me thinking about what’s important to me.  

The more I look at the list, the more resolved I feel. 

One thing I noticed was that I did quite a few projects for people, simply because they asked me to. Sometimes I took things on, because there was a decent payment attached to it.  Often, it wasn’t really work I wanted to do.  So I decided to draw up some rules about the types of projects I wanted to take on.  I also learned that if I didn’t want to do something, I should let people know immediately. These two strategies allowed me to say ‘no’ to work that didn’t align with my intentions. 

The start of the year tends to move slowly for some of us.  At around this time some years back, I asked someone I respected if I could meet them for a coffee to discuss a few career-related issues.  Now I schedule coffee-chats or quick lunches throughout the year. You could even suggest a walk-talk. In many cases, if you explain that you a) admire someone’s work b) want to learn c) you are patient with their shortage of time d) can be focused about what you want to gain from talking with them, it’s unlikely they will turn you down.

Related to the coffee-chats is a habit I was taught when I did a life-coaching course a decade ago. Our tutor asked us about self-care.  She told us to make a list of people we enjoyed seeing and other ways that we could look after ourselves. We were urged to put regular dates in the calendar: exercise sessions, massage or hair appointments, lunch-dates during the working week with interesting/inspiring friends.  When I told my friend about the strategy, over one of our lunches at a Japanese restaurant (where we sit at the same table each time ;)) she gave me some extra tips which I am passing on: “Life is about choices," and "every little bit counts.” 

Whether you are saving for a something, trying to lose weight, or attempting to start a big project, making small inroads is better than fretting about the mountain which lies ahead.

In my neighbourhood, someone started a public wishing hedge. It's a lovely idea but to make your wishes come true, you have to make a plan. 

I am always feel a little low at New Year.  The introvert in me makes an appearance.  So I won't wish you a happy 2019, but a thoughtful one where planning can make a difference.  Do the stock-take and let me know what you think. 

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