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Jane Hutcheon

broadcaster/journalist/author

06 May
2016

Friday Scribbler Personal Life

Jane Hutcheon

For six months a year, the beach is mine.  This is how it looks when it belongs to me; just like this.

The hoards are gone. They mistakenly populate the beach at the least nice time of the year and vacate at the very best time of the year. But perhaps I won’t mention it to the hoards who don't know this.

I was about to enter a stupidly expensive ‘Delicatessen’ when a woman in a tracksuit, sitting on a bench outside, spoke to.

“Can I have some money to buy a coffee at Gusto’s?” she asked.

My brain was misfiring with the following dot-points:

  • The woman in the tracksuit knows the coffee shop well enough to name it
  • She did not look like a drug abuser, although that is impossible to tell these days
  • I do not like giving people on the street money except The Big Issue sellers, the Friday charity days or a few private causes, because I worry the money will be spent on drugs.
  • The lady in the tracksuit was very polite and I liked her

I said, “No, sorry.” That’s what I usually say.

But I really did want her to have a coffee at Gusto’s so I found $5 in coins and went outside again.

“This is for coffee,” I said smiling sternly, “not for anything else.”

“Oh don’t you worry, that’s what I’m going to get.  Thank-you so much darling.”

I went into the stupidly expensive Delicatessen and bought one tin of beetroot, two raw carrots and three bread rolls.

When I came out, the woman in the tracksuit was still there.  I looked surprised.

“Don’t worry Miss, I’m going to get a coffee over at Gusto’s, but if I get another $6 I can get a bagel as well!”

I smiled. She’s just wants everyone else to pay for her breakfast.

“I don’t drink and I don’t smoke. I gave up smoking a month and a half ago,” she said.

I wanted to say, “What about drugs?” but I didn’t. She didn’t seem like a drug abuser, although as I’ve said it’s impossible to tell these days.  People might think that about me.

I headed home past my beach, thinking about Lily Brett.  I met her this week.  I got to interview her and spoke with her afterwards about writing.

She thinks journalists can be very hard on themselves when it comes to writing.  She was never trained as a journalist.  She just started to write.

So I am going home to write and think about Lily Brett.

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